School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care

Postgraduate research profiles

Contact

Lucy Gilkes

Phone: (+61 8) 9449 5140
Fax: (+61 8) 9384 6238


Start date

Feb 2009

Submission date

Dec 2012

Lucy Gilkes

Lucy Gilkes profile photo

Thesis

The effects of a regular cycle of student-delivered clinical audit on disease prevention and health promotion in general practice

Summary

5th year medical students will be performing an audit of disease prevention and health promotion activities in their general practice clinical attachments. This presents a unique opportunity to study the effects of this repeated cycle of student-delivered clinical audit on the practice of the individual GPs and to assess whether this regular cycle of audit produces any change in the quality of documentation and implementation of activities of disease prevention and health promotion in general practice. The audit tool is designed to assess clinical outcomes (e.g. Are cholesterol levels and blood pressure at target level?), and quality of documentation (e.g. Is smoking status recorded? Is family history recorded?).

In this project I will analyse the effect of this clinical audit over time. I also plan to consider whether any characteristics of individual General Practitioners and their Practice affect the implementation of these activities.

Why my research is important

Despite an increasing awareness of the benefits of preventive health strategies there remain many gaps in the delivery of preventive health care in Australia.

Clinical audit is established as an effective way to improve quality of care and to change professional behavior. Despite this, uptake of clinical audit activities by General Practitioners in Australia is low.. A critical first step in improving the potential to conduct systematic audit in general practice is to improve the recording of clinical data. There were no studies on my review of the literature in which medical students were used as data collectors for primary care based audits on disease prevention and health promotion Johnston, Crombie et al identified a number of barriers to effective audit activities. These included, lack of time, lack of resources, lack of training, difficulty making the topic interesting, problems with data collection, lack of clerical support, and lack of experience. . Using medical students, while providing a valuable learning exercise for the students, could provide a way of overcoming many of the barriers to audit activities identified by Johnston and Crombie.

Funding

  • PHCRED Fellowship

 

School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care

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Last updated:
Thursday, 1 October, 2015 12:54 PM

http://www.sparhc.uwa.edu.au/370887